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Health Equity in Gynecologic Oncology: Focus on Limited English Proficiency

Published:October 20, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2022.10.005
      The number of U.S. residents who speak a non-English language has doubled in recent decades. In the 1980s, approximately 23 million (11%) of U.S. residents ages 5 and older reported speaking a language other than English at home [
      • Herzberg E.M.
      • Barrero-Castillero A.
      • Matute J.D.
      The healing power of language: caring for patients with limited english proficiency and COVID-19.
      ]. By 2019, this number had risen to nearly 68 million (22%) [
      • Esterline C.
      • Batalova J.
      Frequently Requested Statistics on Immigrants and Immigration in the United States.
      ]. Among these, 62% speak Spanish, 5% Chinese, 3% Tagalog, and 2% each of Vietnamese, Arabic, French/Cajun and Korean [
      • Esterline C.
      • Batalova J.
      Frequently Requested Statistics on Immigrants and Immigration in the United States.
      ]. Importantly, an estimated 25.5 million (8.2% of the U.S. population) have limited English proficiency (LEP), defined as self-rated English-speaking ability of less than “very well” [
      • Esterline C.
      • Batalova J.
      Frequently Requested Statistics on Immigrants and Immigration in the United States.
      ,
      • United States Census Bureau
      2016—2020 ACS 5-Year Narrative Profile: The United States.
      ].
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